Fun things to do in and around Pueblo

Pueblo is teeming with unique locations and authentic experiences. And, while it might take more than one trip to Pueblo, here are several Pueblo places that you must see!

The friendly atmosphere of the Pueblo Zoo makes it a favorite attraction for families. Located in City Park, it exhibits more than 350 animals from 122 species, including several endangered animals. The zoo’s lovely gardens invite relaxing picnics. Its exceptional education programs are great for students of all ages. One of the most popular new exhibits features playful northern river otters.

The Nature & Raptor Center of Pueblo is located in beautiful Rock Canyon on the banks of the Arkansas River. A delicate blend of aquatic, riparian, transition and semi-arid grassland habitats provide homes to a wealth of plants and animals. Dine in style at the restaurant overlooking the Arkansas River, enjoy an educational talk and demonstration about birds of prey, and bike along the extensive river trail network.

 In honor of Pueblo’s four Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients, the Pueblo Convention Center built the "Home of Heroes" Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial Plaza.  The four larger-than-life, sculpted and bronze statues flank the main entry and welcome you to the Pueblo Convention Center.  The Medal of Honor is the highest military award that can be bestowed upon a member of the United States Armed Forces; Teddy Roosevelt lobbied for one but never received it, and General George Patton said "I'd sell my immortal soul for that Medal."

Nestled in Colorado’s Wet Mountains, this 611-acre mountain park is serenely perfect for year-round hiking, cross country skiing, snowshoeing and stargazing. The Park also hosts guided hikes, camps, yoga getaways, and toddler nature days. The Park’s historic and eco-friendly Horseshoe Lodge also offers amazing woodland accommodations for rejuvenation, exploration or adventure. Just a short drive from Pueblo, the Park lies in the Beulah Valley, a sleepy mountain abode that remains one of Colorado's best-kept secrets.

Visit local Pueblo chile farms to experience the world-famous Pueblo chile in a way the whole family will enjoy. Meet the farmers who grow it, explore their farms, and even pick your own. Then, have it roasted fresh right before your eyes and enjoy the intoxicating aroma that'll keep you coming back for more. 

Blessed with water, sunshine and fertile soil, St. Charles Mesa was settled in the late 1800s/early 1900s by mostly Italian immigrants. These families continue to farm the land of their ancestors with world-famous Mira Sol chiles and lots of other farm-fresh wonders. During the growing and harvest seasons, people can visit farms to buy produce and even pick their own.

With seven rotating galleries, the Sangre de Cristo Arts Center is a must-see stop for art lovers. The Arts Center boasts several art collections that embody the American Southwest, including: the King Collection of Western Art, the world’s largest repository of work by Printmaker Gene Kloss, and a growing collection of historic and contemporary Santos and Retablos.

Once considered Pueblo’s Red-Light District, this historically significant shopping area boasts 83 buildings on the National Historic Register. With the Historic Union Depot on one end and the Historic Riverwalk on the other, this District is perfect for strolling, gallery hopping, shopping, or eating ice cream and cupcakes.

Searching for a new place to visit? A locale that is: Creative. Historic. Artistic. Look to Pueblo's Creative Corridor!  There’s plenty to explore in Pueblo’s Creative Corridor. Art. Music. Dance. Over an easily navigated area, the Corridor is packed with galleries, museums, street sculptures and fountains, cafés and live music—all ready to challenge your imagination and inspire your visit. 

The building at this location is the only remaining firehouse in Pueblo that housed horse-drawn fire equipment and one of two remaining that has the famous brass pole still intact. It was “home” to the valiant men who served with the distinguished Hose Company No. 3. The building was erected in 1881 and the last fire alarm was sounded on March 9, 1979. The building continues its fire-related service to the community through the backing of a fire museum. A wealth of information and pictures, as well as antique fire engines, hose carts and other memorabilia are on display.  

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